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The War on Interruptions

By: Jim Bruce
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One of the most consistent findings in psychology is that people behave differently when their environment changes.  When we are at a place where people are quiet, say a church or a library, we’re quiet;  when we are at a sporting event where it’s loud, we’re loud.

Why then, when we try to make changes at work do we, almost always, focus on people changing rather than on changing the environment.  Often, changing the environment is the easiest way to effect meaningful behavioral change.

Lessons of Fort Sumter

By: Jim Bruce
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Joe Urich from the University of Iowa shared this piece with his on-campus cohort last month and I thought it was worth sharing with everyone.  “Lessons of Fort Sumter”was published in early April in the Wall Street Journal.  The author is Bret Stephens, a columnist for the Journal.

In the short piece he distills from the battle for Sumter five important leadership lessons:

1.  Listen to many opinions.  Don’t just listen to the loud voice, seek options.

Better Time Management is Not the Answer

By: Jim Bruce
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For this week’s Tuesday Reading, we turn to a Harvard Business Review blog post by Linda Hill and Kent Lineback “Better Time Management is Not the Answer.  Hill is the Wallace Brett Donham Professof of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School and Lineback has spent many years as a manager and executive in business and government.  They are co-authors of Being the Boss – The 3 Imperatives for Becoming a Great Leader.

The 5% Creativity Challenge

By: Jim Bruce
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Are you up for a challenge?  Josh Linkner in a recent Fast Company blog post, “The 5% Creativity Challenge, challenges each of us to schedule two one-hour thinking sessions each week.  Linkner is the author of Disciplined Dreaming - A Proven System to Drive Breakthrough Creativity and CEO and Managing Partner of Detroit Venture Partners.

A 90-Minute Plan for Personal Effectiveness

By: Jim Bruce
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Today's reading focuses on building a practice to increase your daily personal effectiveness.  The IT Leaders Program emphasizes being intentional and planful with the use of your time.  Specifically, we've suggested identifying and formally setting aside regular times to plan your week/day.  For example, you might schedule time Sunday evening or on Monday morning to review the coming week to make sure you have reserved time to address your priorities.

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