Neuroscience – Managing Self-Talk

By: Jim Bruce
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Earlier this summer we introduced the idea (in a series of Tuesday Readings, as referenced below) that if we understand how our brain works, we can better understand why we react the way we do.  I wrote, then, that the individual’s brain, in the days of our early ancestors, had one key goal – survival, avoiding threats and seeking food (rewards).  And, avoiding threats had a much higher priority with five times more neural networks devoted to threat detection than to identifying rewards. 

 

IT Centralization and the Innovation Value Chain in Higher Education

By: Ed Clark
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On April 1 we reached out to the MOR Leaders alumni on behalf of Ed Clark, fellow program alum and current CIO of University of St Thomas, with a survey on "IT Centralization and the Innovation Value Chain in Higher Education".  This was part of his PhD dissertation work, in which I am happy to report he passed and earned his degree.  Congratulations Dr. Ed!  As an expression of appreciation, Ed has drafted a summary of his findings to share with you all.  Below please find that output.

Thank you,

Sean McDonald

I Made a Mistake

By: Jim Bruce
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So, what do I do now?

We all make mistakes.  Sometimes they are small and personal like forgetting to put the trash at the curb to be picked up.  Or, larger and embarrassing, like writing the amount differently in numbers and words on a check.  Or, sending a critical email to the wrong addressee.  Or, being the only one to show up for a meeting because you failed to send a notice of the meeting around to the expected attendees.  Or, you crash an application server because you didn’t stop and check the command before you entered it.  Or,

Neuroscience and Change – Part 3

By: Jim Bruce
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SCARF  ::  A User’s Guide

The focus of the past two issues of the Tuesday Reading has been on neuroscience and change.  Today’s essay continues this theme, providing some practical suggestions as to how you can employ SCARF to better understand yourself and to manage and lead others.
 

Neuroscience and Change – Part 2

By: Jim Bruce
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SCARF  ::  Status, Certainty, Ambiguity, Relatedness, Fairness

In last week’s Tuesday Reading, we introduced the concept that our brains have developed in such a way that we are extremely sensitive to threats from change and ambiguity.  We noted how our brains are constantly scanning our environment to detect such threats at a rapid rate.  We also noted that if not addressed the result is distraction, anxiety, and fear, followed by poor performance and more aggressive behavior towards colleagues.  
 

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