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Neuroscience – Managing Self-Talk

By: Jim Bruce
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Several years ago, in a series of Tuesday Readings,1,2,3 I introduced the idea that when we understand how our brain works, we can better understand why we react the way we do. I wrote, then, that an individual’s brain, in the days of our early ancestors, had one key goal – survival, avoiding threats and seeking food (rewards). And, avoiding threats had a much higher priority with five times more neural networks devoted to threat detection than to identifying rewards.  

Feedback? Or Advice?

By: Jim Bruce
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… Which do I need?

 

I’ve been working on a rollout plan for a new major application. And, before I present that plan to the clients, I need to give the presentation a test run. I can ask my test audience to give me feedback or I could ask them for advice. What do I do? Does it make a difference?
 

You Cannot Excel at Everything

By: Jim Bruce
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Several years ago, at the Harvard Business School, Frances Frei, UPS Foundation Professor of Service Management, and Amy Schulman, Senior Lecturer in Technology and Operations Management, taught a new course “Why You Should Care: Creating the Conditions for Excellence” to a group with equal numbers of law and management students. The purpose of the course was to help the business and law students help each other define and achieve their own interpretations of success.
 

Feedback is a Gift

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s Tuesday Reading is an essay by John E. Hill, Instructional Technologies Specialist at Cornell University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. His essay first appeared as a leaders program reflection earlier this year. [John may be reached at  <jeh24@cornell.edu>.]
 
 

Tell Those Negative Voices in Your Head to Be QUIET!

By: Jim Bruce
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There is nothing particularly special about hearing negative voices in your head. I suspect that most of us have, at one time or another. Some of us may even hear these voices frequently. And, some of these voices may be so strident as to lead one to disbelieve the credibility of any successes that she or he has experienced. It may surprise you that research suggests that some 70% of adults hear these strident voices at one time or another, and sometimes frequently.
 

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