Goals & Practices

Opening Gifts

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s Tuesday Reading is “Opening Gifts.”  This essay’s author is Roger Schwarz, CEO of Roger Schwartz and Associates and it recently appeared in his blog.

Schwarz begins by noting that we receive a lot of intangible gifts from those we work with.  They are often not always wrapped in lovely wrapping paper with beautiful bows.  And, whether nicely presented of not, too often we dismiss them without a second thought or any curiosity.

Real Influence – Part 2

By: Jim Bruce
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This week’s Tuesday Reading “Real Influence,” from the title of Mark Goulston and John Ullmen’s book “Real Influence:  Persuade Without Pushing and Gain Without Giving In,” is a continuation of the reading begun last week.  Goulston is a business psychiatrist, executive coach and cofounder of Heartfelt Leadership.  Ullmen oversees the website MotivationRules.com and teaches at the UCLA Anderson School of Management.  This reading is drawn from four HBR blog posts from the two authors.

Real Influence – Part 1

By: Jim Bruce
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I’ve titled this week’s Tuesday Reading “Real Influence” from the title of Mark Goulston and John Ullmen’s book “Real Influence:  Persuade Without Pushing and Gain Without Giving In.”  Goulston is a business psychiatrist, executive coach and cofounder of Heartfelt Leadership.  Ullmen oversees the website MotivationRules.com and teaches at the UCLA Anderson School of Management.  This reading is drawn from four HBR blog posts from the two authors.

Fors and Againsts

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s reading is a post, “Fors and Againsts,” that recently appeared in the Creative Leadership blog of John Maeda.  Maeda, who currently is the President of the Rhode Island School of Design, calls himself a graphic designer, computer scientist, academic, and author.  Previously, he was E. Rudge and Nancy Allen Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and Associate Director of Research at MIT’s Media Laboratory.

Reflecting on Your Leadership Journey

By: Sean McDonald
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Indeed, as Marshall Goldsmith suggests, “What Got You Here Wont Get You There”, but it is still important to understand that what got you here did get you here.  We have become the leaders we are today because of a unique set of varying experiences.  We’ve been taught new things, shown the right ways, seen bad ways, been part of amazing teams, struggled at times, been let go, promoted, challenged, led, followed, etc… These all piece together into our own individual leadership journeys.

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